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Can fizzy drinks ruin my teeth?

Posted by info on July 30, 2014 at 10:55 AM

Research shows that orange squash, cola and other carbonated drinks can cause both dental erosion and tooth decay.

 

Tooth erosion involves the loss of hard tissue from the tooth's surface through a chemical reaction with acids - many of which are found in carbonated fruit drinks. If untreated, it can cause sensitivity, enamel fracture and pain.

 

Tooth decay occurs as a result of high sugar content in our drinks. Some fizzy drinks can contain up to 21 lumps of sugar in just one can. The good news is that sugar-free fizzy drinks (or diet drinks) do not lead to tooth decay. They can, however, still erode your teeth by wearing away the hard tissue or enamel.

 

Each time you drink anything sugary, your teeth are under 'acid attack' for up to one hour after drinking. This is when sugar from drinks reacts with bacteria in our plaque (the sticky coating on our teeth) and produces harmful acids.

 

Dentists claim it only takes a week for an extracted tooth in a glass of cola to become a jelly-like mass.

 

Even more surprising is the news that even sparkling water can also damage our teeth. This is because our teeth are constantly being bathed in a weak acid solution containing carbon dioxide.

 

Dentists recommend drinking from a straw to help minimise acid attacks because fluid is being drawn to the back of your throat, rather than hitting the front of your teeth directly.

 

Verdict: Fizzy drinks can cause both tooth decay and erosion. If you want to limit the damage to your teeth, choose sugar-free fizzy drinks (or diet drinks) because they do not cause tooth decay. They can, however, still erode your teeth by wearing away the hard tissue or enamel.


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